One World, 35 Years Later…

Superman reunited with his old pal Jeremy in Downtown Metropolis on the eve of the World Peace Summit – an event marking over three decades of sustained Nuclear disarmament (Photograph: Andy Hanton)

Jillan Freisen, DAILY PLANET 14:00 ET July 24th 2022 – 

History repeated itself in The city of Metropolis earlier today when The Man Of Tomorrow came face to face with a friend from yesterday.  For those who recall the bizarre chain of events leading to Superman’s campaign to rid the world of Nuclear Weapons exactly 35 years ago, they may also remember how it culminated in a global battle with a maniacal radioactive foe that almost triggered World War III less fondly.

Having hurled Earth’s Nuclear stockpile into the core of the sun and defeated criminal mastermind Lex Luthor’s monster, Superman later concluded world peace was ‘not his to give’ after all and has adopted a neutral stance ever since.  While the fallout and collateral damage across the globe may have been enormous (with Metropolis alone left with a regeneration bill in the Billions) Superman’s ‘Quest For Peace’ is nonetheless cited as one of the turning points in Mankind’s history, with the ending of the Cold War one of its lasting legacies –

 

The Man Of Steel poses outside the UN Building in 1987 with the youngster who’s simple plea prompted a change in Earth’s history (Photograph: James Olsen)

As for the young student whose impassioned words ushered in the winds of change, he stands by his actions all those years ago and says he’s do it over again.  Jeremy Brooke, now 48 and a leading force for UNICEF, maintains that some of the best wisdom still comes from the mouths of babes –

Its difficult for people to understand now, but in the mid to late 80’s a Nuclear Holocaust was a very real fear, with tensions rising on both sides it often felt to us that war was an inevitability rather than a possibility.  When I put pen to paper that day it just occurred to me that only one man could save us from ourselves ” 

And on the subject of his Kryptonian pal Brooke continued-

“Superman took a lot of criticism from all sides for what he did – people said he was mounting this big campaign but that was wrong – he was answering a call for help like he always does and that’s a very different thing.  I could tell he was conflicted about interfering in our destiny but he could also see how easily we could destroy ourselves.  Thank god – and I mean this – thank god he did as if the arms race had continued it could only have had one conclusion…”

 

The original letter as penned by Brooke during class 35 years ago is now regarded as a significant historical document, worthy of preservation in the Smithsonian where it is currently on display.

 

69…

Today would have been Christopher Reeve’s 69th Birthday.  Here at SUPERMANIA, and similarly with Superman websites all across the globe, we honour his legacy by remembering him as a husband, father, actor, humanitarian and the actor who would forever personify the original comic book hero.

Over forty years since he set the standard by which all other comic-book based performances would be judged, his BAFTA-winning portrayal still resonates, his powerful influence still echoed in the many live-action interpretations produced since.  For many fans though, his timeless combination of sincerity, physicality, compassion and overall righteousness have made Christopher Reeve virtually incomparable.  The story of his casting is now as big a part of cinematic history as when Vivien Leigh was cast as Scarlett O’Hara as was his ascension to to Superstardom and ultimately, tragedy.

Such was the impact made on a generation that most refuse to consign his memory to history, instead honouring him through media for later generations to enjoy.  One of the best recent examples is DC Comics Superman ’78, a six-part series with written by Robert Venditti and illustrated by Wilfredo Torres that perfectly echoes the Donnerverse by emulating the late Geoffrey Unsworth’s cinematography on paper accompanied by dialogue delivered in clear homage to writer Tom Mankewicz.  At the centre, of course, is Reeve’s dual characterisation back in action again, delighting its core audience whilst appealing to the new.  This, with new licensed merchandise appearing regularly ensures that the definitive Man of Steel remains at the forefront of popular culture and, through the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, a significant contribution to humanity left by a super man.

Rest in peace, ‘Toph…

 

#releasethefuriecut

“We’re Gunslingers…And you don’t win every duel…”

On paper the notion seemed sound.  He wasn’t Richard Donner (Or indeed Lester) but nevertheless a tenured Director with an impressive resume littered with some notable titles, The Ipcress File, The Entity and more recently cult sensation Iron Eagle.  Moreover he was keen, available and as this particular project was now Christopher Reeve’s baby, a shoe-in after Wes Craven’s vision was met with Indifference.

Unfortunately Sidney J. Furie had it all against him.  Taking on a franchise that had already derailed, its future now in the hands of easily the most notorious producers of the age and a star looking to dominate proceedings wherever possible.  Superman IV: The Quest For Peace was always going to be somewhat insurmountable, but nobody could have foreseen just what twists and turns lay ahead.

Indeed, according to producer Michael Kagan ‘Nobody wanted to make a bad movie’ even though the script by Laurence Konner & Mark Rosenthal (with story input by Reeve) was considered to be in dire need of another draft.  Reeve had already been served with a lawsuit from outraged would-be writers Barry Taft and Ken Stoller who claimed the Nuclear disarmament theme of the story was theirs. The case would eventually be thrown out but was the start of many obstacles to overcome.  The Go-Go Boys, (having bought the series from the dejected Salkinds at a discount on a sunny afternoon in Cannes) were nothing if not keen to get the picture made and out to its built-in audience in order to help Cannon Films finance the 30plus projects shooting around the globe at the time.

In the above interview with Steven Simak taken from the Summer 1987 Issue of Galactic Journal Magazine, Furie at least seems to have a clear outlook, fighting for Margot Kidder to be reinstated and citing that heavy-handed auteurship (i.e. Dick Lester) could be detrimental to the truth of the character.  Arguably the love-triangle described with the introduction of Mariel Hemmingway’s character that Furie seems so keen to explore were among the best scenes in a film otherwise consumed by the spectre of visual effects done on the cheap.

Details about the infamous test-screening were recently revealed by Visual Effects artist Harrison Ellenshaw, who stated that while he sat in with the audience, Furie patiently waited in a cafe across the road.  When the showing, (and indeed, the rioting) was over, Ellenshaw reported back to Furie who allegedly asked ‘Was it that bad??’  Word soon got back to Warner Bros. who would issue a simple, yet damning directive before general release – ‘Lose two reels’. 

The resulting cuts are well-documented but the fallout remains.  The sub-plots, the runtime, the soundtrack. Clive Mantle’s entire part – the list goes on.  At one time thought to be merely a rough cut, Ellenshaw did confirm the test screening was that of the full-length feature, warts & all – and despite long being thought destroyed, Warner Bros. have confirmed the print survived and is stacked among the multitude of cans rescued from the Pinewood Studios vault to facilitate the Richard Donner cut of Superman II.

So with all this information finally brought to light – and over three decades later – can there be closure on the enigma that is Superman IV?  The choice, as ever, seems to rest with the fans.  For all the furore that saw the eventual release of @thesnydercut people seem to forget that @releasethedonnercut was not only first, but revolutionary in terms of studios response to the DC fanbase.  We (the Superman community) proved that it can be done.  We know what it takes to be done.  We also now have the benefit of knowing the footage exists so it could be done.  I therefore beseech anyone with even the slightest interest in this film to make their feelings known to @warnerbros and @warnerarchive to #releasethefuriecut and see the full extent of his much-maligned vision.  We owe it to ourselves as Superman fans but we also owe it to a Director who suffered the humiliation of having 45minutes cut from his picture, leaving an incoherent mess.

Alongside the campaign for the release, hopefully you will have heard my ramblings on the @thecapedwonderpodcast, #releasethefuriecut on Twitter, and the amazing restoration work done by @aaronprice.  I will be writing a separate post on that topic shortly but meantime, all these efforts have not gone unnoticed by the man himself, who, at 88 is still going strong and recently posted in response to seeing what can be achieved with modern VFX with “This is wonderful – if only we had this kind of technology back then…”